Finished the first of the new breed of Laurel Canyon artists clock. Joni (featuring her Ladies of the Canyon album), Carole King, Mamas and Papas and Doors first single Light My Fire. Photos: all at their places in the Canyon in the late 60s (Carole’s shot was during the photo shoot for the Tapestry cover). I’ll have to do Crosby, Stills and Nash in the next clock since they formed at Mama Cass’s place. Click on the clock photo for a better look at the records.

Also see facebook.com/collidingvinyl; for more information,  contact me at collidingvinyl@gmail.com

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Latest clock is custom for OverTones friend and wonderful photographer Cass Summer. She wanted all California, so the Doors first album anchors it, with Beach Boys and others weighing in around the periphery. And “A Summer Song.” And I’m enjoying the beautiful “mystery meadow” scene in an enlargement from Cass’s work.

To see her beautiful photography:  Cassandra Summer Photography

For more information on the custom clocks, email collidingvinyl@gmail.com, and visit facebook.com/collidingvinyl

 

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This was the simplest clock I’ve ever made. Just Frank on his own Reprise label, framed by a turntable ring from a proper-vintage tabletop phonograph.  Still offered 16rpm.  If we could just get that ghosted dude out of the reflection.

For more information on the custom clocks, email collidingvinyl@gmail.com, and visit facebook.com/collidingvinyl

Dan Nachison procures a Colliding Vinyl Timepiece at our OverTones concert – the clock is my tribute to the British Invasion, with singles by the Beatles (I Wanna Hold Your Hand), Dave Clark Five, Stones, Who, Herman’s Hermits, all on an Animals LP. Dan is a great supporter of our group.

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The Fab Four had only been successful, modestly, in the U.K (with their first single, Love Me Do) when the John Lennon composition “Please Please Me” was recorded – with heavy influence from producer George Martin, who had them speed up the song. It became their first single released in the U.S., in early 1963, and included on their first U.S. album release.  Both are here in this clock.

Here’s proud owner (purchased at our OverTones concert).

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Layered vinyl tiers flank the triangle in Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon, the iconic album that kept selling steadlily decade after decade.  Jen is the proud purchaser (for a friend) at our OverTones-thrown concert last week.

Got my 3D record-player-technology framed collages finished and hanging above our “American by Magnavox” console phonograph entertainment center (circle 1948), which now serves as a lazy-susan bar, along with the vintage bakelite table-top, also serving fine spirits. Brother Records 45 (Beach Boys) anchors vacuum tubes and knobs, while frame one below pays tribute with fragments of a 78rpm, 45 and LP.

Inside the bottom cabinet of the American – more LPs.